You are viewing the page for Jun. 11, 2007
  Select another date:
<<back forward>>
SpaceWeather.com -- News and information about meteor showers, solar flares, auroras, and near-Earth asteroids
SPACE WEATHER
Current conditions
Solar wind
speed: 398.8 km/sec
density: 0.1 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2245 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: A8
2145 UT Jun11
24-hr: B8
0025 UT Jun11
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2245 UT
Daily Sun: 11 June 07
Sunspot 960 poses no threat for strong solar flares. Credit: SOHO/MDI
Sunspot number: 14
What is the sunspot number?
Updated 10 June 2007
Far side of the Sun:
This holographic image reveals no large sunspots on the farside of the sun. Image credit: SOHO/MDI
Planetary K-index
Now: Kp= 1 quiet
24-hr max: Kp= 1
quiet
explanation | more data
Current Auroral Oval:
Switch to: Europe, USA, New Zealand, Antarctica
Credit: NOAA/POES
Updated: 2007 Jun 11 2114 UT
Interplanetary Mag. Field
Btotal: 3.6 nT
Bz: 0.7 nT south
explanation | more data
Updated:Today at 2246 UT
Coronal Holes:
There are no large coronal holes on the Earth-facing side of the sun. Credit: SOHO Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope
SPACE WEATHER
NOAA Forecasts
Updated at: 2007 Jun 11 2203 UTC
FLARE
0-24 hr
24-48 hr
CLASS M
05 %
05 %
CLASS X
01 %
01 %
Geomagnetic Storms:
Probabilities for significant disturbances in Earth's magnetic field are given for three activity levels: active, minor storm, severe storm
Updated at: 2007 Jun 11 2203 UTC
Mid-latitudes
0-24 hr
24-48 hr
ACTIVE
15 %
15 %
MINOR
05 %
05 %
SEVERE
01 %
01 %
High latitudes
0-24 hr
24-48 hr
ACTIVE
20 %
20 %
MINOR
05 %
05 %
SEVERE
01 %
01 %
What's up in Space
June 11, 2007
The space shuttle is docked to the ISS. Would you like a call when the pair fly over your backyard? Sign up for SpaceWeather PHONE.

QUIETING SUN: The slow decay of sunspot 960 continues, and it now poses no threat for strong solar flares or radiation storms. Spacewalking astronauts have nothing to fear from the quieting sun.

TWO SPACESHIPS: "After a day of playing cat and mouse, Atlantis has finally docked with the International Space Station," says Frank Ryan Jr. who photographed the pair flying over Shannon, Ireland, last night:

Rivaling Venus in brightness, Atlantis and the ISS are easy to see through backyard telescopes. (The trick is knowing when to look.) Ryan captured his image using a 5-inch Meade ETX-125 telescope and a digital webcam. "I stacked 30 good frames and processed them in Registax. The results really surprised me!"

more images: from Ralf Vandebergh of the Netherlands; from David Campbell of Didcot, Oxfordshire, UK; from Rudolf Dobesberger of Neuzeug Austria

BLUE PLANETS: Winds of 30 to 40 mph were swirling around DeSoto, Kansas, last week when photographer Doug Zubenel "stepped outside to enjoy the windy black night. Immediately, I noticed a blue corona around Venus," he says: image.

Next, he turned his telescope toward Jupiter, and it was blue, too:

"Three of Jupiter's largest moons are lined up next to Jupiter at the 8 o'clock postion," notes Zubenel.

Why was everything blue? Atmospheric optics expert Les Cowley measured the diameter of the corona and concluded that "it was caused by dust particles about 38 micron (1.5/1000") across. Coronas are mostly created by diffraction around the rims of small particles. It hardly matters whether the particles are water drops, pollen, stratospheric dust or in this case dust raised by local high winds."


2007 Noctilucent Photo Gallery
[Listen!] [Night-sky Cameras]

Near-Earth Asteroids
Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.
On June 11, 2007 there were 868 potentially hazardous asteroids.
June-July 2007 Earth-asteroid encounters:
Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Mag.
Size
2005 AD13
June 18
33 LD
16
1.2 km
2007 FV42
July 2
53 LD
15
1.2 km
2007 DT103
July 29
9.3 LD
15
550 m
Notes: LD means "Lunar Distance." 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.
Essential Links
NOAA Space Environment Center
  The official U.S. government bureau for real-time monitoring of solar and geophysical events, research in solar-terrestrial physics, and forecasting solar and geophysical disturbances.
Atmospheric Optics
  The first place to look for information about sundogs, pillars, rainbows and related phenomena.
Solar and Heliospheric Observatory
  Realtime and archival images of the Sun from SOHO.
Daily Sunspot Summaries
  From the NOAA Space Environment Center
Current Solar Images
  from the National Solar Data Analysis Center
  more links...
©2007, SpaceWeather.com -- This site is penned daily by Dr. Tony Phillips.
©2013 Spaceweather.com. All rights reserved.