October 2006
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  Summary: October began with a mild (Kp=5) geomagnetic storm. Its source: a solar wind stream flowing from a coronal hole hit Earth on Sept. 30th. The resulting auroras were photographed as far south as Wisconsin and Michigan.
  Photographer, Location Images Comments

Ivar Gudmundsson,
Sep. 30
#1, #2, #3, #4, more

Photo details: Canon 350D, w/17-40L, F4 @iso 800, F4, 20sec shutter

Jeff Hapeman,
Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin
Oct. 01
#1, more

Last night, on a whim, I decided to check the POES satellite imagery and it appeared that nice geomagnetic substorm was in progress, so I took my camera down to our dock, and sure enough, a nice display was in progress. The display included nice beams and rays, and moving curtains. There were a few folded arcs, and two to three layers of curtains late in the show--about 2am Central Standard Time.

Photo details: 30s exposure with a Canon 5D, 24mm f/1.4L lens set at f/2.8, and ISO 1600.

Ginger Cooley,
Palmer, Alaska USA
Oct. 01
#1, #2, #3, more

I really lucked out last night. The northern lights were literally all over the sky. It was hard to chose one area to photograph when there was so much to take in! I went ahead with this tree image because the tree had a majestic appearance against the sky.

Marshall Comisar,
Chippewa National Forest - North of Grand Rapids, Minnesota
Sep. 30
#1, more

Taken around 10:30 over North Star Lake.

Photo details: Canon Digital Rebel XT, ISO 400, 60s, f4.0

Tony Wilder,
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin
Sep. 30
#1, #2, #3, more

What started off with a green glow over northern horizon and ending with a bang the following morning, the aurora storm late Saturday night sure made my day complete. My son turned One Year Old tonight and I couldn't think of a better way to end the day.

Photo details: Canon EOS Rebel XT bulb ISO 400 f1.8 28 seconds. Taken between 10pm and 1am. Happy Birthday Brady.

Steinthor Hafsteinsson,
Holmsberg lighthouse, Iceland
Sep. 30
#1, #2, more

Snapped a few photos of these auroras last night.

Photo details: Canon EOS 30D, iso 800, 13s, F/4.0, 10 mm

Chris Gray,
Selkirk Dist. Manitoba Canada
Sep. 30
#1, #2

Image one saws a nice multi coloured ribbon over an old farmstead. Image two shows the aurora, tree and The Seven Sisters. All in all the show lasted almost 5 hours. It was very good and the plus 10 temperature certainly helped.

Photo details: Nikon D2X, iso 800, f2.8, various shutter speeds

Luke Smith,
Anchorage, Alaska
Oct. 01

I took this photo at the Mountaineering Club of Alaska's Ice Climbing Festival, held this past weekend at the Matanuska Glacier, about 100 miles northeast of Anchorage. It was my first attempt at photographing the aurora.

T. Scott Blankinship,
St. Johns, Michigan, USA
Oct. 01

I was parked along a dirt road in front of a cornfield hoping the skies would clear. They did about 20 minutes before I could see the aurora. Unfortunately, the County Sheriff came to investigate just as the aurora began. After 20 minutes (with his bright lights flashing), he let me be. I have seen better displays in our Upper Peninsula, but considering I was at 43 degrees latitude (53 degrees magnetic latitude) and minutes from home, I was still pleased.

Photo details: Minolta X370, 28 mm, f2.8 lens, approximately a 40 second exposure on Fuji ISO 400 film.

David Noble,
5 miles northeast of Delta Junction, Alaska
Sep. 30
#1, #2, more

Nice zenithal green arcs with some shades of red. The mean position of the arcs are moving further south.

Photo details: Olympus SP-500UZ digital, 400 ASA, 15s exposure, 2.8f-stop

Steinthor G. Hafsteinsson,
Just south of Grindavik, Iceland
Oct. 2
#1, more

Took this picture last night outside Grindavik Golfclub clubhouse. I think the streak next to the house is an airplane and not a meteor or anything like that although I do think it looks very cool.

more images: from Horace Smith of Bath, Michigan; from Ben Nicholson of Armstrong, British Columbia, Canada; from Mike Lynn of Helena, Montana;