You are viewing the page for Jun. 27, 2007
  Select another date:
<<back forward>>
SpaceWeather.com -- News and information about meteor showers, solar flares, auroras, and near-Earth asteroids
SPACE WEATHER
Current conditions
Solar wind
speed: 391.9 km/sec
density: 0.9 protons/cm3
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at 2255 UT
X-ray Solar Flares
6-hr max: B9
1800 UT Jun27
24-hr: B9
1800 UT Jun27
explanation | more data
Updated: Today at: 2245 UT
Daily Sun: 27 June 07
Sunspot 961 has a simple , stable magnetic field that poses no threat for strong solar flares. Solar activity remains low. Credit: SOHO/MDI
Sunspot number: 11
What is the sunspot number?
Updated 26 June 2007
Far side of the Sun:
This holographic image reveals no large sunspots on the farside of the sun. Image credit: SOHO/MDI
Planetary K-index
Now: Kp= 2 quiet
24-hr max: Kp= 2
quiet
explanation | more data
Current Auroral Oval:
Switch to: Europe, USA, New Zealand, Antarctica
Credit: NOAA/POES
Updated: 2007 Jun 27 2137 UT
Interplanetary Mag. Field
Btotal: 2.8 nT
Bz: 2.5 nT south
explanation | more data
Updated:Today at 2256 UT
Coronal Holes:
A solar wind stream flowing from the indicated coronal hole should reach Earth on or about June 29th. Credit: SOHO Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope
SPACE WEATHER
NOAA Forecasts
Updated at: 2007 Jun 27 2137 UTC
FLARE
0-24 hr
24-48 hr
CLASS M
15 %
15 %
CLASS X
01 %
01 %
Geomagnetic Storms:
Probabilities for significant disturbances in Earth's magnetic field are given for three activity levels: active, minor storm, severe storm
Updated at: 2007 Jun 27 2137 UTC
Mid-latitudes
0-24 hr
24-48 hr
ACTIVE
10 %
15 %
MINOR
05 %
05 %
SEVERE
01 %
01 %
High latitudes
0-24 hr
24-48 hr
ACTIVE
15 %
25 %
MINOR
05 %
15 %
SEVERE
01 %
01 %
What's up in Space
June 27, 2007
Where's Saturn? Is that a UFO--or the ISS? What's the name of that star? Get the answers from mySKY--a fun new astronomy helper from Meade.

PLANETS ALIGN: Venus and Saturn are converging for a close encounter on June 30th when the pair will be only 2/3o apart. You can watch the distance shrink in the nights ahead. Step outside after sundown and look west. Venus is the brightest object in the sky; Saturn is the yellow dot right beside it. Sky maps: June 27, 28, 29, 30, July 1.

ANOTHER SUNSPOT: A new sunspot is lurking just over the sun's eastern limb. Its approach is revealed in an x-ray image taken this morning by Japan's Hinode spacecraft:

In the foreground we see a seething-hot cloud of gas held suspended by magnetic force fields above sunspot 961. Another such cloud lies in the background--but the underlying sunspot is still over the horizon. The sun's 27-day rotation should move this new active region into view during the next 48 hours. Amateur astronomers, if you have a solar telescope, keep an eye on the sun's eastern limb.

MORNING NLCs: This morning before sunrise in Leipzig, Germany, "a friend called and woke me up," reports Christian Schmidt. "There were noctilucent clouds outside, bright enough to see over the light polluted city of Leipzig!" He took this picture:


Photo details: Nikon Coolpix 4500, 100 ASA, 20s exposure

Similar displays were seen by early risers in Britian and across Canada. "I was heading out to my car and I instantly saw these noctiucent clouds!" says Lukas Gornisiewicz of Dunmore, Alberta. "They're the best I've seen in three years."

Why this morning? No one can answer that question. The formation of noctilucent clouds (NLCs) is a mystery, and until that mystery is solved, it is impossible to forecast precisely when they will appear. We do know however, that NLCs prefer summer, and they are easiest to see about 90 minutes before sunrise or after sunset. Be alert!

more June 27th images: from Lance Taylor of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; from Alan C Tough of Elgin, Moray, Scotland.

EXTRA--NLC PILLARS: "What a stunning NLC display we had here before dawn," reports Martin McKenna of Northern Ireland. "Once the normal clouds broke, I was blessed with the strangest of sights. Shooting up over my neighbors rooftop were multiple thick intense white pillars of NLCs with vertical dark shadow shafts - I have never seen structure like this before!" Photos: #1, #2.

Near-Earth Asteroids
Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.
On June 27, 2007 there were 872 potentially hazardous asteroids.
June-July 2007 Earth-asteroid encounters:
Asteroid
Date(UT)
Miss Distance
Mag.
Size
2005 AD13
June 18
33 LD
16
1.2 km
2007 FV42
July 2
53 LD
15
1.2 km
2007 DT103
July 29
9.3 LD
15
550 m
Notes: LD means "Lunar Distance." 1 LD = 384,401 km, the distance between Earth and the Moon. 1 LD also equals 0.00256 AU. MAG is the visual magnitude of the asteroid on the date of closest approach.
Essential Links
NOAA Space Environment Center
  The official U.S. government bureau for real-time monitoring of solar and geophysical events, research in solar-terrestrial physics, and forecasting solar and geophysical disturbances.
Atmospheric Optics
  The first place to look for information about sundogs, pillars, rainbows and related phenomena.
Solar and Heliospheric Observatory
  Realtime and archival images of the Sun from SOHO.
Daily Sunspot Summaries
  From the NOAA Space Environment Center
Current Solar Images
  from the National Solar Data Analysis Center
  more links...
©2007, SpaceWeather.com -- This site is penned daily by Dr. Tony Phillips.
©2013 Spaceweather.com. All rights reserved.